Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Birds of North America

 Books, Education  Comments Off on Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Birds of North America
Apr 172017
 

Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginners Field Guide to Common Birds of North America 
by Sharen and Mark Mellicker

This is the second in a series of children’s books written as field guides for the young bigfoot lover.  The first book walked with a family of bigfoots through the woods and pointed out tree species and how to identify them.  In this book we travel with the same bigfoot family, but this time focus on various woodland habitats and the birds that live in them.  Each page has a narrative as the main text with the margins filled by illustrations by Sharen Mellicker depicting birds and how to identify them.  

While reading this book, lesson plans and projects came rushing into my head, as is the tendency with any professional educator.  If I was still a classroom teacher, I would use this book as a template for a student assignment.  After all, there are few better “hooks” to get a young person reading than to get them reading about bigfoot.  

Sasquatch Multi Tool

 Products  Comments Off on Sasquatch Multi Tool
Mar 252017
 

Sasquatch Multi Tool

 Being a fan of all things sasquatch, as well as cool gadgets and tools, I had to tell you all about this little gem.  While I wouldn’t want this to be my only multi tool in a survival situation (I prefer a good bushcraft knife), it would serve you well in most other camping situations.  

This bigfoot tool contains the following uses, though the creative (or hard-pressed) could figure out several others, I’m sure:

  • A – Hex wrenches.
  • B – Bottle opener.
  • C – Cord cuter.
  • D – 1″ Ruler. E – Flathead screwdriver.
  • F – Phillips head screwdriver.
  • G – Butterfly wrench. H – Can opener

Click the following link or the photo above to order your own Sasquatch Multi-Tool before you need it next!

Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective – Book Review

 Books, Data, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective – Book Review
Mar 012017
 

Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective: The Hidden Life of a North American Hominin 
By T. A. Wilson

 

In a nutshell, Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective is a book that looks at data from various sources and uses that data to come to conclusions about bigfoot.  The sources range from John Green’s sightings database, the BFRO database, and various books and publications.  Wilson uses his own field experiences as grounds for his conclusions as well, as any field researcher should do.

The book is definitely a valuable resource for researchers.  Wilson has created numerous charts and graphs in which he shows a breakdown of how many reports from Green’s database show a certain characteristic, such as height, arm length, or even the types of foods sasquatches have been seen eating.  In fact, there is an entire section at the end of the book that only features these graphics, though they are peppered throughout the book in the appropriate chapters where those features are discussed. 

A notable chapter in the book solely deals with the value and reliability of eyewitness testimony.    This is particularly important to bigfooters because of the assumption by skeptics that eyewitness testimony is unreliable.  Using data from psychological field studies, Wilson clearly shows that eyewitnesses are adroit at getting the main details of unusual events correct in retellings. 

Other conclusions Wilson draws from the data are interesting to note, though many have been published elsewhere, such as the running speed of saquatches, how far and high they can jump, and others.  However, even when rehashing these particular abilities, he does an excellent job using sighting reports to support his claims. 

There are several points where my own opinion differs from that of Wilson’s.  These points tend to come from assumptions that Wilson makes.  Fore example, one entire chapter of the book details how sasquatches couldn’t possibly be a relict form of Gigantopithecus.   While I am far from certain that sasquatches are relict Gigantos, I wouldn’t be so quick to dismiss the idea.  Wilson sites the research done by Cinchon in his book, Other Origins: The Search for the Giant Ape in Human Prehistory, probably the most complete book on the discovery and analysis of the Gigantopithecus fossils.  Many assumptions about Gigantos have been made by both Cinchon and Wilson that would be difficult to know considering how few fossils we have of these creatures.  No post cranial fossils of the species have been recovered, and everything we know about these creatures is derived from a handful of mandibles and a few hundred teeth.  Saying that they were quadrupeds is as speculative as saying they were bipedal.  Saying that Gigantos were almost exclusively herbivorous, had limited endurance, or only ranged locally are other examples of speculations based on incomplete data. 

Another glaring example where my opinion diverges from that of Wilson has to do with the sasquatch hand.  Since Wilson assumes that sasquatches are a hominin, which could very well be true, he also assumes that they would have to have human-like hands for precision grip.  Yet the data suggests otherwise.  Wilson contests the idea that the sasquatch thumb lies parallel to the other fingers.  Such a thumb, if limited to this one position, would indeed lack the ability to pick up, grasp, and hold objects, just as he claims.  Wilson’s mistake is his assumption that the sasquatch thumb can ONLY lie parallel to the other fingers.  Just as your thumb can move inwards in a grasping motion and back and forth on a more horizontal plane, sasquatch thumbs seem to do the same.  In fact, the available sasquatch hand casts show the thumb to be impressed at various angles from the other fingers demonstrating this mobility.  Wilson uses many paragraphs to explain why such an inflexible and strange hand structure could not possibly be used for the variety of applications that sasquatch hands must be used for.  I agree.  The problem here is the inflexible idea that sasquatch hands can only bend a certain direction.  I would argue that assuming a sasquatch thumb can only move in that limited way is a product of rigid expectations. 

This cast was collected by Wes Sumerlin in the Blue Mountains. Note the angle of the thumb compared to the other fingers.

This huge hand was cast by Paul Freeman in the Blue Mountains. Note the thumb position as it bends inwards towards the camera.

The Titmus hand cast from the Bluff Creek area. Note the thumb lying parallel to the other fingers on the left.

Since Wilson disagrees with the hand analysis supported by Krantz and Meldrum based on the Freeman hand casts, he therefore goes on to assume that the Freeman handprint evidence, and indeed other casts not collected by Freeman but are often ascribed to him because they were collected in the Blue Mountains, are all hoaxes.  This assumption then spills over to any evidence thought to have been collected by Freeman in the Blue Mountains.  In my opinion, this is an error.  Not only does most of the Freeman evidence stand up to analysis, but many of the so-called Freeman casts were actually collected by others, including Wes Sumerlin, Dar Addington, John Mionczynski,  Vance Orchard, and others.  Unfortunately due to incomplete and poorly-recorded data, these others’ contributions to the Blue Mountains evidence has been incorrectly ascribed to Paul Freeman.  

Don’t get me wrong.  Just because I disagree with some of Wilson’s conclusions doesn’t make this book any less valuable.  In fact, I agree with most of his conclusions about bigfoots.  I can also happily say that I picked up a couple things from the book that I hadn’t considered before.  Wilson bravely speculates on what he thinks bigfoots are and can do, which makes for a much bolder book than the compendium of sighting reports that most bigfoot books end up being.  Early in the book Wilson states that these are only his conclusions and he can be reasonably disagreed with.  All good researchers should have this opinion.  None of us have all the facts, and Wilson uses statistical analysis well to support many of his conclusions. 

The book can be a little dry at times, as any statistical analysis can be, but the text is information-rich.  I don’t agree with some of Wilson’s assumptions, but I also don’t mind my own assumptions being challenged by others, such as Wilson, when they are well-informed, use data, and have some field experience to back them up.  While peppered with sighting reports, this is not a narrative, and the eyewitness reports are included to support Wilson’s conclusions as examples.  For those scientifically-minded bigfooters that use facts and data to drive their opinions about sasquatches, I strongly recommend reading this book. 

Click the link below to purchase your copy of this excellent bigfoot book. 

 

Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective: The Hidden Life of a North American Hominin

Territorial Behavior

 movie  Comments Off on Territorial Behavior
Feb 282017
 

A new bigfoot movie has just been realeased called Territorial Behavior. Directed by Peter Bergin, it seems to be an interesting combination of a tale of survival and and bigfoot lore.  

I have only seen a few clips shared with me by Peter, but I like what I’ve seen so far!  A particularly cool scene is when a bigfoot pushes its face into the walls of a tent from the outside.  Creepy stuff, if you ask me, yet something we’ve all been asking and hoping for.

Territorial Behavior

The title is available on Amazon starting today, February 28th, 2017.  For more information, visit the film’s Facebook page.  Click in the picture or title immediately above to be the first in your squatching circles to own this film on DVD or Blue Ray!  

Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods

 Books, Education, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods
Feb 242017
 

Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods 
By Dana Lynd

I love it when people think outside the box, and there is not doubt that author Dana Lynd did just that when coming up with the idea for Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods.  

The book shares an account of a family’s camping trip to the woods.  Knocks are heard, a footprint is found, but not much really comes from the events.  When the end of the book is reached, the reader is instructed to turn the book over and backwards, and then to read the book again.  This time it is presented from the eyes of a sasquatch watching the family on their camping trip.  

The book is an excellent example of perspectives in storytelling, and with a sasquatch as a silent protagonist, it would certainly be a favorite in the classroom or at home.

To order the book, click the links above.  For more suggestions on bigfoot books for kids and teens, click this link

Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Trees of North America

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Trees of North America
Feb 232017
 

Walking with Bigfoot – A Beginners Guide to Common Trees of North America 
By Sharen and Mark Mellicker

This book is a short field guide of trees in North America as seen from a walk with a family of bigfoots.  Each page has easily read, hand-written information on bigfoots, trees, or their fruits.  The language is not “dumbed-down” for young readers, giving them the real scientific terms for classifications of leaves.  A visual glossary of leaf terminology is given in the last pages of the excellent book for young naturalists/bigfooters.  

The art in this field guide is of an interesting style.  It seems to be a combination of paint, markers and collage.  This combination makes many of the features in the art pop off of the page for the reader.  It would also inspire young artists to try their hands at using these same techniques.  If any original bigfoot art is created in your home using these techniques, I’d love to see it!  Email a copy of it to me by clicking here!  

A family of bigfoots chill while you read about wild fruits of North America.

At the publisher’s website, NatureLoverBooks.com, you can find links to bigfoot information, nature art projects and more.  It’s a great resource for parents and teachers alike.  

To buy a copy of this excellent book, click this link.

Historic Bigfoot Business in Oakhurst, CA

 California, Everybody loves the 'squatch, footprints, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Historic Bigfoot Business in Oakhurst, CA
Feb 212017
 

Bigfoot Burger Pit

Bigfoot Drive-In Burger Pit in Oakhurst, CA

This historic photograph was found on The Studebaker Drivers Club Forum and was posted by user “kurtruk” with the following information: 

Bigfoot Drive In Burger Pit was in Oakhurst, Ca on Hwy 41. Closed in the early 1980’s. Former MLB pitcher Rudy May owned the property and was going to build another restaurant on the site but never did AFAIK. Restaurant had a few yellowed newspaper clippings, and a casting of a Bigfoot “footprint.”

What I would like to know is whatever happened to that footprint cast?  Was it a copy or an original?  Where and when was it cast?  Do any of my readers have any information on this?  If you find out anything on this, or already know something about this, please contact me!  

Senate Bill to Make Sasquatch the Official WA State Cryptid

 Conservation before discovery, Everybody loves the 'squatch, Laws  Comments Off on Senate Bill to Make Sasquatch the Official WA State Cryptid
Feb 192017
 

WA official state cryptid: Sasquatch!

Washington moves to make sasquatch the state’s official cryptid!

Sasquatch is everywhere nowadays, and I’m not just talking about in the woods.  You can see sasquatches on billboards, commercials, and everybody’s favorite reality TV series.  Strangely enough, though, there is not a single mention of the creatures in the state laws of Washington despite the tourism dollars brought there by the hairy hominoid (though there are a couple local ordinances).  That might be about to change.  

Senator Ann Rivers who represents the 18th Legislative District in Washington has proposed a bill to make sasquatch the official state “cryptid,” or undiscovered animal.  This was brought on by a letter from “Caleb,” a boy who lives in her district.  

Some might complain that this sort of thing doesn’t belong in the solemn halls of legislative government, but I would strongly suggest otherwise.  A very large sum of money is spent in Washington every year by bigfooters coming to conferences, paying for campsites, buying gasoline, buying souvenirs, and going on paid expeditions looking for evidence of sasquatches.  These bigfooters therefore use the public lands set aside by the state, thus ensuring their protection for future generations.  Clearly, bigfoots have played a small yet significant role in Washington’s tourism and public lands.  

I predict that as bigfoots become more prominent in the minds of the public, and especially after academic acceptance of the species, they will play a huge economic role in Washington and other states.  How will they be protected?  What, if any, rights will they be granted to ensure their safety and autonomy?  Will they be viewed as threats or assets?  How will our own views of the lands they live on be changed?  All these questions and more will surface, so it’s a good thing to put sasquatches on the minds of Washingtonians now, before they are proven as a real species, so some of these questions can be pondered before answers are demanded.

Here’s a snippet from the press release: 

Child’s letter prompts bill to designate Sasquatch as state ‘cryptid’

Read the rest of the article by clicking this link.

More on the Sulawesi Tool Makers

 Anthropology, Asia, Human Ancestors  Comments Off on More on the Sulawesi Tool Makers
Feb 102017
 

Signs of a tsunami? Ancient tools from the island of Sulawesi show that human ancestors island-hopped around Southeast Asia, perhaps illuminating the origins of the ancient tiny humans called hobbits. – Photo by Erick Setiabudi

A new article published in Nature details the latest developments in the study of mysterious stone tools discovered on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia.  The makers of these tools remains unknown and is pondered in a previous blog article on this site.  

This discovery is pertinent to the study of bigfoot for several reasons.  First of all, at least three species of unknown hominoids are reported throughout Indonesia.  One fits the description of the orang pendek on Sumatra which can be speculated to be a type of bipedal orangutan.  The other is more manlike, but smaller, and is referred to as the ebu gogo on the island of Flores.  This form is probably a relict form of Homo floresiensis.  The last of the three commonly reported forms fits the description of the North American sasquatch, and is in fact present in the folklore of Sulawesi where the tools were found.  

While it is unlikely that the larger, sasquatch-like form is responsible for these tools, the study of pre-modern humans and our relatives should always be encouraged.  It is within this framework that the sasquatch will eventually be recognized by science.  Though paleoanthropology is a newer science, it will certainly help provide a foundation for the subject of bigfoot and other unknown hominoids in the near future.  

For interested readers, the best book (by far) to detail the possible unknown hominoids found in the folklore of Southeast Asia is Images of the Wildman in Southeast Asia: An Anthropological Perspective by Gregory Forth.  It is detailed, scientific, and open-minded while remaining skeptical.  For any serious student of wildmen in that part of the world, I cannot recommend this book enough.  

 

Archaeologists dug deep in Sulawesi, excavating 10 meters down. Photo by Dida Yurnaldi

Ancient tools may shed light on the mysterious ‘hobbit’

The “hobbit” had neighbors. Back in 2004, researchers announced the discovery of this tiny, ancient human, which apparently hunted dwarf elephants with stone tools on the Indonesian island of Flores 18,000 years ago. Its discoverers called the 1-meter-tall creature Homo floresiensis, but skeptics wondered whether it was just a stunted modern human. In the years since, researchers have debunked many of the “sick hobbit” hypotheses. Yet scientists have continued to wonder where the species came from.

Now, an international team originally led by the hobbit discoverer reports stone tools, dated to 118,000 to 194,000 years ago, from another Indonesian island, Sulawesi, likely made by another archaic human—or possibly by other hobbits. “It shows that on another island we have evidence of a second archaic early human,” says paleoanthropologist Russell Ciochon of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, who was not involved with the work. The discovery makes the original hobbit claim appear more plausible, he says, by suggesting that human ancestors may have island-hopped more often than had been thought.

After international debate over the hobbit’s origins, co-discoverer Michael Morwood—then an archaeologist at the University of Wollongong (UOW) in Australia—set out to search other islands from which the tiny humans may have come. Java—more than 800 kilometers west of Flores but with a chain of islands in between—was already known to be the ancient home of the human ancestor H. erectus, a globe-trotting species that dates as far back as 1.7 million years ago. But Morwood instead set out for Sulawesi, 400 kilometers to the north, because powerful ocean currents sweep southward from this island toward Flores. Researchers had already found some simple stone tools on Sulawesi, but they couldn’t date the artifacts because they were found on the ground rather than buried with datable minerals.  

Click this link to read the rest of the article.

Orangutan Research Predicts What Bigfoot Research Will Look Like

 Animals, Anthropology, Apes, Biology, primates  Comments Off on Orangutan Research Predicts What Bigfoot Research Will Look Like
Jan 172017
 

A male Sumatran orangutan challenges a rival by baring his teeth and shaking branches. Now recognized as a distinct species, Sumatran orangutans number around 14,000 in the wild.

The below article is one of the best short articles I have read in a long time about the trials and tribulations of doing research on orangutans.  While reading it, I was struck by the similarity between what orangutan researchers put up with and what bigfoot field researchers deal with, and what professionals biologists will have to deal with after species recognition.  Long excursions to desolate locations, listening for howls and calls to locate the creatures, and difficulty visually observing the animals are all commonalities while doing field work on these elusive and solitary apes.  

“Sometimes I feel like I’ve chosen the most difficult thing in the world to study,”  
– Cheryl Knott, biological anthropologist

I’m sure it feels like this to Cheryl Knott, but bigfoot research after the species is recognized by science will be even harder.  Like orangutans, sasquatches seem to live mostly solitarly lives, or if they do travel in groups, they do so at a distance from one another.  Orangutans also have large territories and wander widely, but being a terrestrial species rather than the arboreal orangutans, sasquatch range would be much larger, and they would move much faster.  

Keep these challenges in mind as you read the below article.  Also, note the behavioral similarities between sasquatches and orangutans, such as the long calls and pushing down of trees in territorial displays.  Articles like this leave me wondering about what unknown sasquatch behaviors they share with orangutans and the other apes that are waiting to be observed.

Inside the Private Lives of Orangutans

 

Scientists are gaining vital insights into the red apes at a time when they face a precarious future.