Sasquatch Nest eDNA Study

 DNA, Meldrum, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Sasquatch Nest eDNA Study
Jun 232017
 

Big news on the science front is just emerging, and you can be a part of it.  But first, let me give you a little background.  

If you haven’t yet heard, some very peculiar nests which very well might have been made by the local sasquatches in the area have been found on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington.  Over twenty nests have now been discovered in an area not larger than one square mile.  The site, which is off-limits to the general public, has been under observation for two years by some of the top researchers from the Olympic Project.  I will leave it to them to eventually publish the findings and results of their study at a future time.  For now, just know that this is going on, and has been for a couple years now.  

I have personally seen the nests, and I am very impressed by them.  I will go on record as saying that I believe sasquatches made them.  They were constructed by twisting and breaking off branches from the surrounding huckleberry bushes which grow up to 8 feet tall in the area.  The branches were brought to the nest locations and seemingly woven in an intentional shape that most resembles the ground nests of gorillas.  The only other contender for possibly having made the nests would be a black bear, but a biologist who saw the nests noted that if this is black bear behavior, it is undocumented black bear behavior.  Nothing like this has been seen before by anyone involved.  

Recently, Dr. Jeff Meldrum was taken to the nest site area and shown a number of the nest structures.  He took core samples from a number of the nests and will now attempt to get an environmental DNA analysis, or eDNA study, done on them.  

Environmental DNA, also known as eDNA, is a way to get DNA from the environment, hence the name.  This means that samples can be taken of dirt from the floor of caves, feeding sites, nests, or other locations where an animal is known to have been and tested for residual DNA, thus proving their presence.  This technique has already been used to obtain DNA from a variety of animal species, including extinct species such as Neanderthals and Denisovans, both extinct hominins (or thought to be extinct) closely related to humans.  Click here to read about these remarkable finds.  

EDNA testing is pretty expensive, though, and that’s where we come in.  Dr. Meldrum has started a crowd-funding effort to raise the money to get the samples tested.  This is something we can all do together as a community to help provide solid, verifiable, scientific evidence for the existence of sasquatches.  No donation is too small, and every dollar counts.  I have donated, and I recommend you do too.  Please share the link widely, post it on your social media accounts, and be loud and proud that you are helping to possibly solve the mystery of bigfoot.  Click this link to participate in the fund raising campaign to prove bigfoot is real by eDNA analysis.  

Sure, there is a chance that these are not nests made by sasquatches.  Perhaps this will be another dead end, like so many efforts that have come before.  But, think about it…  How would you feel if this proves bigfoot is real and you didn’t donate even a dollar?  This is an opportunity to participate in what could be the biggest scientific discovery of the new century.  It’s worth a buck.  Do it.  

Click here to donate.  

 

Mar 142013
 

Genome sequencing of our [currently recognized] closest species relative has been completed.  Considering all the DNA news that has been tossed around in the bigfoot community over the last couple years, the following article should be on most every bigfooter’s reading list.  This information could be useful to put into context the data that has been made available.

Enjoy the following from Primatology.net:

The Completed Bonobo Genome
Posted by Kambiz Kamrani in Anthropology, Blog, Bonobo,Molecular Biology

The bonobo genome is sequenced. The letter reporting was recently published in Nature, and is available openly under the title, “The bonobo genome compared with the chimpanzee and human genomes.” Kay Prüfer from the Max Plank Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology is the lead author. There are some interesting preliminary comparisons such as:

  • Bonobos and chimps have 99.6% sequence similarity
  • Bonobos and humans have 98.7% sequence similarity
  • The split of bonobo and chimpanzee is confirmed to have approx. 1 million years ago, with no inbreeding occurring
  • 6% of the bonobo genome has evidence of incomplete lineage sorting (when an allele does not match the population history of a species)
  • This has lead to the observation that ~1.6% of the bonobo genome is more similar to humans than chimpanzees

Jan 092011
 

Whenever an article is published about human ancestors, I always read it with my bigfoot goggles on, meaning  that I look for connections to sasquatches. I strongly suspect that bigfoots are humans’ closest living relatives (although I leave plenty of room for other hypothetical species of bigfoot-like critters from other parts of the world), and if this is true it makes sense that we can learn about sasquatches by learning about humans.

Right now, bonobos and chimps hold the title of our closest cousins.  Since chimpanzees and humans share nearly 96% of their DNA sequence, it should be expected that sasquatches would be right in that ballpark too, if not even closer in relation.

The following article caught my eye, not only because of the human ancestor connection, but also because it mentions cross-breeding.  The anthropological community (which you are a part of if you’re interested in apes, humans, sasquatches, and the connections between them) will be hearing a lot more about cross-breeding in the coming years, so start brushing up on it now.

A molar tooth of a Denisova, a group of early humans
who lived in central Asia about 40,000 years ago.



NEANDERTHAL RELATIVE
BRED WITH HUMANS

A previously unknown Siberian group, the Denisovans,
left fingerprints in some humans’ DNA.

Content provided by Laura Sanders, Science News



Neanderthals need to make room for a new kid sister in the early human family.  


By sequencing the full genome of a girl’s fossil finger bone found in a Siberian cave, researchers conclude that there must have been a closely related sister group of Neanderthals living in central Asia about 40,000 years ago. The data also show that, like Neanderthals, the mysterious group interbred with modern humans, in this case leaving behind a genetic fingerprint in modern-day Melanesians of Papua New Guinea and Bougainville Island, nearly 10,000 kilometers (6,213 miles) from where the fossil was found.


The new genetic information, reported Dec. 23 in Nature, underscores the fluidity of human evolution and hints that even more groups are waiting to be uncovered [emphasis added by Cliff], says paleoanthropologist Milford Wolpoff of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “We’re just scraping the outside of what’s probably a much more complex picture.”


Read the rest of the article here.