Jun 202014
 
The footprint cast photographed against a 1/2 inch grid.

Another cast has been added to the Orang Pendek Project database on my official website.  This one shows some interesting anatomy, but was also worn down in the shipping process by inadequate packaging.

Click here to see even more photographs of the cast and footprint!

The Sumatran tracker, Jhon, measuring the footprint
 in the ground before casting.

May 222014
 
An orang pendek cast collected on July 14, 2013.

The Orang Pendek Project has been an amazing project to work on, but it has not been without its setbacks and frustrations.  Some of these frustrations arise from incomplete documentation or lost data.  After all, the project spans three continents and two languages.  That’s not even to mention the cultural differences that sometimes cause confusion or other complications.

This cast is a great example of these complications.  There was a track investigation on July 14, 2013, and several photographs of a footprint in the ground were recorded that day.  The cast seen above came with the bundle of data sent by my Sumatran contact that serves as a middle-man.  However, the cast cannot be from the footprint pictured in the ground; it’s the wrong foot!

We apparently have some missing data somewhere, but I will still record this footprint as from the date above.  Perhaps it is another footprint from the same line of prints?  Perhaps it’s from another date altogether?  I do not know, and am unlikely to ever know.  I do know that as the project proceeds, the documentation is getting better and better.  Hopefully this sort of error will be avoided in the future.

I present the data, fuzzy as it may be, for your enjoyment.

Click here to read more about this print, and to see more photographs.

Jan 172014
 

A day or two before July 9, 2013, a man named Pak Jintan observed an orang pendek from his farm near Hulu Batang Barau. The creature was walking on two legs along the edge of his farm near the jungle around 3 o’clock in the afternoon. He described it has being approximately one meter tall (39 inches), yet having a large body. This can be interpreted as meaning very massive for its size. The creature’s fur was described as grey and long. After the creature disappeared into the forest, Pak Jintan went to where he saw the creature and found at least one footprint (it is not known how may prints were observed since only one was photographed).

Jan 162014
 

Back in 1959 when the Tom Slick yeti expeditions were in full swing, the government of Nepal felt it necessary to lay down some regulations regarding the effort.  The official government document (seen above) states three simple rules to follow.  To sum them up, pay the Nepalese government for trying, don’t shoot one, and everything obtained on an expedition should be “surrendered” to the government.

It is not known to what extent the Slick expeditions intended to follow these regulations, especially in light of the theft of a bone from the Pangboche Yeti Hand relic.  Still, these were the rules at the time which Slick and his man in the field, Peter Byrne, were expected to follow.

To read the best account of the Tom Slick expeditions of this era, I highly recommend Loren Coleman’s Tom Slick and the Search for the Yeti.  It is a fascinating look into both these efforts and the creatures themselves.

For more on modern efforts to research the yeti, click here.

Jan 142014
 
The Pangboche yeti relic replicas

My search for the yeti started nearly forty years ago as a very young boy watching documentaries like “In Search Of” about hairy hominoids around the world. Never in my wildest imagination, even after I started doing my bigfoot research, did I expect to have the opportunity to travel to the Himalayas in search of the yeti for myself. Yet that opportunity did arise, thanks to my position on Finding Bigfoot.

In September, 2013 the crew and I traveled to Kathmandu, Nepal to start our investigations. Kathmandu is a busy, crowded city, overrun with swarms of scooters and merchants hocking their wares. The city’s population more than doubled over the first decade of the new century, and its infrastructure is struggling to keep up. Yet in the old market area, Kathmandu’s ancient charm persists.

Sep 182013
 

This little blurb caught my eye from the August, 2013 edition of National Geographic.  If you have any more information on international bigfoot creatures, let me know by emailing me at NorthAmericanBigfoot@gmail.com.