Star Wars and Sasquatch, Together Again

 Art  Comments Off on Star Wars and Sasquatch, Together Again
May 122017
 

 

Yes, it’s really true.

Like most people my age, I am a fan of Star Wars, and have been since seeing the original in the theaters back in 1977.  At that early age, I even thought that Chewbacca was a sasquatch, which of course makes me smile all these years later due to the whole Matilda fiasco, but I digress.  

Whenever Star Wars crosses with the bigfoot subject, I am, of course interested, so when I saw the graphic above I wanted to learn more.  As it turns out, the story above is true!  There is, in fact, a comic book with this story line that was produced by Dark Horse Comics with the above story line.  The story, entitled Into the Great Unknown, is contained in Star Wars Tales, Volume 19.

As it turns out, the comic book itself seems to be out of print.  The only link Amazon has is below:

Star Wars Tales Vol. 19

The good news is that someone has put the comic book out on Youtube for everyone’s enjoyment.  So, below is the Youtube version of that comic book, but be sure to give it a read in case the copyright folks notice that it’s up!  

Pre-1958 “Bigfoot” Reference

 History  Comments Off on Pre-1958 “Bigfoot” Reference
May 062017
 

As every bigfooter probably knows, the word “bigfoot” was coined by Jerry Crew and his road building employees back in 1958 when they started finding large footprints going across the freshly torn up road they were building the day before.  Jerry and his crew were puzzled by these prints (though the Yurok natives on the crew knew what was responsible for them and started leaving the job because of it), so he consulted his taxidermist friend, Bob Titmus, who gave him plaster and directions on how to cast the footprints.  Jerry made a cast and brought it to the local paper in Eureka, and soon a newspaper story was written.  The story then spread on the AP news wire, and viola!  America had a name for that hairy biped that had been seen all over the country: “Bigfoot.”  

Of course, the creatures called bigfoot weren’t invented in 1958.  Hairy wildmen have been reported in North America for as long as there have been people there.  The wildmen just weren’t called “bigfoot” yet.  The word, “bigfoot,” was first used to publicly refer to sasquatches in 1958 when Jerry made those casts and brought one to the paper.  

I had always thought that “bigfoot” was the term used solely because the footprints that Jerry Crew and his men found were big.  That seemed simple enough, and there was never any good reason to question that assumption…  Until now.  There might have been another influence on Jerry’s choice of names.

Recently, I received an email from a woman named MaryAnn with a link to an episode from the 1950’s western, Death Valley Days.  The episode’s title was “Mr. Bigfoot.”  The episode is copyrighted 1956, two full years before Jerry named the creature that was making those big footprints.  

 

Scroll to the bottom of this article to watch the full episode of “Mr. Bigfoot” from the series, “Death Valley Days.”  

The episode is as corny as one would expect television to be in the mid 1950’s, and it made me smirk a number of times.  At around the 25 minute mark in the episode, Professor Muchmore starts talking about “Mr. Bigfoot.”  Muchmore explains that huge footprints measuring 18 inches long were occasionally found in the Owens Valley just west of Death Valley back in the 1860’s.  The footprints were six inches across the toes, and the stride was seven feet long when the creature was walking.  Sound familiar?

In the end, the tracks end up being a vehicle for the Professor to play Cupid, and much of what he told the protagonist about those footprints is never explained nor expanded upon.  But still, the size of the footprints, the stride, and the fact that the local Indians had a name for the creature all ring true with what we now think of as “bigfoot.” 

The details and possible implications of this episode are interesting to ponder.  I wonder if the episode’s writer had some knowledge of large footprints.  Did some other person, perhaps a resident of the Owens Valley, observe footprints of this size and tell the episode’s producers or writers about it?  The Owens Valley would be a likely place for a sasquatch to live.  There are bigfoot reports to this day in the Owens Valley.  At one time it would have been even better bigfoot habitat, especially back in the 1860s when the footprints were supposedly found in this fictional story, when the valley was more lush

And now, our feature presentation:  

Drink Beer Until You Believe in Sasquatch

 Products  Comments Off on Drink Beer Until You Believe in Sasquatch
May 022017
 

Drink ‘Till You Believe – Engraved Beer Glass

There are several ways to come to believe that sasquatches are real.  Of course, the fastest way is to see one with your own eyes.  Another way, though long and labor-intensive, is to become well educated on the subject, its history, and the available evidence.  Another way, one that is the “lazy-person’s-quick-and-easy-way” would be to drink beer until you believe.  This might be one of the more fun ways as well.  

If the latter of the above methods is the one that most appeals to you, there is a product that guides you to your goal, whether it be believing in bigfoot or drinking a lot of beer.  Pictured above is the Drink ‘Till You Believe Engraved Beer Glass, complete with permanently etched markings to let you know where you are on the “I believe” gradient.  Drink a little and you stay a skeptic.  A bit more leads you to the “on the fence” mark.  Towards the end of your glass, you believe.  Finally, when you finish the delicious beverage, you actually see one (or so it says at the bottom of the glass, like the happy face on the bottom of a child’s oatmeal bowl).  

I guess the downside of this product is that when you wake up after an intensive night of using this glass for bigfooting, you might not believe anymore.  More likely, you won’t want to have anything to do with sasquatches again because of the hangover. (To save face, just tell your friends that you’ve been zapped and the bigfoot psychically damaged your brain.)  

You probably know a beer-loving bigfooter.  We can be notoriously difficult to buy for, being the eccentric folk we are.  This gift might be just what they’ve always wanted but didn’t know existed. Click here or on the picture above to order one right now!  

For whatever it’s worth, though I love beer, I strongly recommend that you become a bigfoot believer through the method of become well-educated in the subject, its history, and the available evidence.  You can still enjoy a beer while reading bigfoot books, though!  

 

304th Rescue Squadron

 Everybody loves the 'squatch  Comments Off on 304th Rescue Squadron
Apr 202017
 

The 304th Rescue Squadron is a Air Force Reserve Command combat-search-and-rescue unit located at Portland Air National Guard Base, Oregon.  Like all good Pacific Northwesterners, they have a certain love for bigfoot, or so their logo makes it seem.  

The 304th Rescue Squadron has taken on many missions over its lifespan, including over 100 immediately following the eruption of Mount St. Helens.  They have missions in both peace and wartime.  

Check out their Facebook page and post a “hello” from a bigfoot lover.  Tell them Cliff sent you!

Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Birds of North America

 Books, Education  Comments Off on Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Birds of North America
Apr 172017
 

Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginners Field Guide to Common Birds of North America 
by Sharen and Mark Mellicker

This is the second in a series of children’s books written as field guides for the young bigfoot lover.  The first book walked with a family of bigfoots through the woods and pointed out tree species and how to identify them.  In this book we travel with the same bigfoot family, but this time focus on various woodland habitats and the birds that live in them.  Each page has a narrative as the main text with the margins filled by illustrations by Sharen Mellicker depicting birds and how to identify them.  

While reading this book, lesson plans and projects came rushing into my head, as is the tendency with any professional educator.  If I was still a classroom teacher, I would use this book as a template for a student assignment.  After all, there are few better “hooks” to get a young person reading than to get them reading about bigfoot.  

Sasquatch Multi Tool

 Products  Comments Off on Sasquatch Multi Tool
Mar 252017
 

Sasquatch Multi Tool

 Being a fan of all things sasquatch, as well as cool gadgets and tools, I had to tell you all about this little gem.  While I wouldn’t want this to be my only multi tool in a survival situation (I prefer a good bushcraft knife), it would serve you well in most other camping situations.  

This bigfoot tool contains the following uses, though the creative (or hard-pressed) could figure out several others, I’m sure:

  • A – Hex wrenches.
  • B – Bottle opener.
  • C – Cord cuter.
  • D – 1″ Ruler. E – Flathead screwdriver.
  • F – Phillips head screwdriver.
  • G – Butterfly wrench. H – Can opener

Click the following link or the photo above to order your own Sasquatch Multi-Tool before you need it next!

Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective – Book Review

 Books, Data, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective – Book Review
Mar 012017
 

Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective: The Hidden Life of a North American Hominin 
By T. A. Wilson

 

In a nutshell, Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective is a book that looks at data from various sources and uses that data to come to conclusions about bigfoot.  The sources range from John Green’s sightings database, the BFRO database, and various books and publications.  Wilson uses his own field experiences as grounds for his conclusions as well, as any field researcher should do.

The book is definitely a valuable resource for researchers.  Wilson has created numerous charts and graphs in which he shows a breakdown of how many reports from Green’s database show a certain characteristic, such as height, arm length, or even the types of foods sasquatches have been seen eating.  In fact, there is an entire section at the end of the book that only features these graphics, though they are peppered throughout the book in the appropriate chapters where those features are discussed. 

A notable chapter in the book solely deals with the value and reliability of eyewitness testimony.    This is particularly important to bigfooters because of the assumption by skeptics that eyewitness testimony is unreliable.  Using data from psychological field studies, Wilson clearly shows that eyewitnesses are adroit at getting the main details of unusual events correct in retellings. 

Other conclusions Wilson draws from the data are interesting to note, though many have been published elsewhere, such as the running speed of saquatches, how far and high they can jump, and others.  However, even when rehashing these particular abilities, he does an excellent job using sighting reports to support his claims. 

There are several points where my own opinion differs from that of Wilson’s.  These points tend to come from assumptions that Wilson makes.  Fore example, one entire chapter of the book details how sasquatches couldn’t possibly be a relict form of Gigantopithecus.   While I am far from certain that sasquatches are relict Gigantos, I wouldn’t be so quick to dismiss the idea.  Wilson sites the research done by Cinchon in his book, Other Origins: The Search for the Giant Ape in Human Prehistory, probably the most complete book on the discovery and analysis of the Gigantopithecus fossils.  Many assumptions about Gigantos have been made by both Cinchon and Wilson that would be difficult to know considering how few fossils we have of these creatures.  No post cranial fossils of the species have been recovered, and everything we know about these creatures is derived from a handful of mandibles and a few hundred teeth.  Saying that they were quadrupeds is as speculative as saying they were bipedal.  Saying that Gigantos were almost exclusively herbivorous, had limited endurance, or only ranged locally are other examples of speculations based on incomplete data. 

Another glaring example where my opinion diverges from that of Wilson has to do with the sasquatch hand.  Since Wilson assumes that sasquatches are a hominin, which could very well be true, he also assumes that they would have to have human-like hands for precision grip.  Yet the data suggests otherwise.  Wilson contests the idea that the sasquatch thumb lies parallel to the other fingers.  Such a thumb, if limited to this one position, would indeed lack the ability to pick up, grasp, and hold objects, just as he claims.  Wilson’s mistake is his assumption that the sasquatch thumb can ONLY lie parallel to the other fingers.  Just as your thumb can move inwards in a grasping motion and back and forth on a more horizontal plane, sasquatch thumbs seem to do the same.  In fact, the available sasquatch hand casts show the thumb to be impressed at various angles from the other fingers demonstrating this mobility.  Wilson uses many paragraphs to explain why such an inflexible and strange hand structure could not possibly be used for the variety of applications that sasquatch hands must be used for.  I agree.  The problem here is the inflexible idea that sasquatch hands can only bend a certain direction.  I would argue that assuming a sasquatch thumb can only move in that limited way is a product of rigid expectations. 

This cast was collected by Wes Sumerlin in the Blue Mountains. Note the angle of the thumb compared to the other fingers.

This huge hand was cast by Paul Freeman in the Blue Mountains. Note the thumb position as it bends inwards towards the camera.

The Titmus hand cast from the Bluff Creek area. Note the thumb lying parallel to the other fingers on the left.

Since Wilson disagrees with the hand analysis supported by Krantz and Meldrum based on the Freeman hand casts, he therefore goes on to assume that the Freeman handprint evidence, and indeed other casts not collected by Freeman but are often ascribed to him because they were collected in the Blue Mountains, are all hoaxes.  This assumption then spills over to any evidence thought to have been collected by Freeman in the Blue Mountains.  In my opinion, this is an error.  Not only does most of the Freeman evidence stand up to analysis, but many of the so-called Freeman casts were actually collected by others, including Wes Sumerlin, Dar Addington, John Mionczynski,  Vance Orchard, and others.  Unfortunately due to incomplete and poorly-recorded data, these others’ contributions to the Blue Mountains evidence has been incorrectly ascribed to Paul Freeman.  

Don’t get me wrong.  Just because I disagree with some of Wilson’s conclusions doesn’t make this book any less valuable.  In fact, I agree with most of his conclusions about bigfoots.  I can also happily say that I picked up a couple things from the book that I hadn’t considered before.  Wilson bravely speculates on what he thinks bigfoots are and can do, which makes for a much bolder book than the compendium of sighting reports that most bigfoot books end up being.  Early in the book Wilson states that these are only his conclusions and he can be reasonably disagreed with.  All good researchers should have this opinion.  None of us have all the facts, and Wilson uses statistical analysis well to support many of his conclusions. 

The book can be a little dry at times, as any statistical analysis can be, but the text is information-rich.  I don’t agree with some of Wilson’s assumptions, but I also don’t mind my own assumptions being challenged by others, such as Wilson, when they are well-informed, use data, and have some field experience to back them up.  While peppered with sighting reports, this is not a narrative, and the eyewitness reports are included to support Wilson’s conclusions as examples.  For those scientifically-minded bigfooters that use facts and data to drive their opinions about sasquatches, I strongly recommend reading this book. 

Click the link below to purchase your copy of this excellent bigfoot book. 

 

Bigfoot in Evolutionary Perspective: The Hidden Life of a North American Hominin

Territorial Behavior

 movie  Comments Off on Territorial Behavior
Feb 282017
 

A new bigfoot movie has just been realeased called Territorial Behavior. Directed by Peter Bergin, it seems to be an interesting combination of a tale of survival and and bigfoot lore.  

I have only seen a few clips shared with me by Peter, but I like what I’ve seen so far!  A particularly cool scene is when a bigfoot pushes its face into the walls of a tent from the outside.  Creepy stuff, if you ask me, yet something we’ve all been asking and hoping for.

Territorial Behavior

The title is available on Amazon starting today, February 28th, 2017.  For more information, visit the film’s Facebook page.  Click in the picture or title immediately above to be the first in your squatching circles to own this film on DVD or Blue Ray!  

Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods

 Books, Education, Uncategorized  Comments Off on Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods
Feb 242017
 

Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods 
By Dana Lynd

I love it when people think outside the box, and there is not doubt that author Dana Lynd did just that when coming up with the idea for Sasquatch Tales: Woodbooger’s Woods.  

The book shares an account of a family’s camping trip to the woods.  Knocks are heard, a footprint is found, but not much really comes from the events.  When the end of the book is reached, the reader is instructed to turn the book over and backwards, and then to read the book again.  This time it is presented from the eyes of a sasquatch watching the family on their camping trip.  

The book is an excellent example of perspectives in storytelling, and with a sasquatch as a silent protagonist, it would certainly be a favorite in the classroom or at home.

To order the book, click the links above.  For more suggestions on bigfoot books for kids and teens, click this link

Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Trees of North America

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Walking With Bigfoot – A Beginner’s Field Guide to Common Trees of North America
Feb 232017
 

Walking with Bigfoot – A Beginners Guide to Common Trees of North America 
By Sharen and Mark Mellicker

This book is a short field guide of trees in North America as seen from a walk with a family of bigfoots.  Each page has easily read, hand-written information on bigfoots, trees, or their fruits.  The language is not “dumbed-down” for young readers, giving them the real scientific terms for classifications of leaves.  A visual glossary of leaf terminology is given in the last pages of the excellent book for young naturalists/bigfooters.  

The art in this field guide is of an interesting style.  It seems to be a combination of paint, markers and collage.  This combination makes many of the features in the art pop off of the page for the reader.  It would also inspire young artists to try their hands at using these same techniques.  If any original bigfoot art is created in your home using these techniques, I’d love to see it!  Email a copy of it to me by clicking here!  

A family of bigfoots chill while you read about wild fruits of North America.

At the publisher’s website, NatureLoverBooks.com, you can find links to bigfoot information, nature art projects and more.  It’s a great resource for parents and teachers alike.  

To buy a copy of this excellent book, click this link.